The good old days-or maybe not.

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Pitchy
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The good old days-or maybe not.

#1 Post by Pitchy » Thu Oct 11, 2018 8:17 am

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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#2 Post by Sixgun » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:50 am

Pitchy,
I'd say "maybe not". I love looking at those old pics when men were men and women were glad of it.....but...it was hard in those days. Even my dad's time, growing up in the twenties and thirties was hard.

I'll take today's time over anytime.... Even if your a lazy 20 year old, you will still eat good with a roof over your head. For extra cash you can rob liquor stores, sell drugs, protest against old white men, scream down Republican senators while they are eating...etc..-----6
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#3 Post by piller » Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:54 am

It sort of seems that the easy living we have today does lend itself to more folks lacking a work ethic or a moral compass. Maybe we have it too easy.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#4 Post by AJMD429 » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:13 pm

piller wrote:
Thu Oct 11, 2018 11:54 am
It sort of seems that the easy living we have today does lend itself to more folks lacking a work ethic or a moral compass. Maybe we have it too easy.
Yep.... :|
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#5 Post by OldWin » Thu Oct 11, 2018 12:49 pm

Love old pictures like that. Humans are at their best when facing struggle. We are builders and explorers as a species.
Life is easier today, but I don't think the quality of life is as good.
Loss of personal freedom, purpose, and moral righteousness has cost us as a whole.
I'd probably never make it if I went back. Had it too easy for too long. :D
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#6 Post by Pitchy » Thu Oct 11, 2018 2:38 pm

Yep those old pics are cool but sobering, Deadwood looked like a he!! hole and probably was.
Those two trappers in front of the cabin looked like they were doing pretty good dressed in pretty nice cloths.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#7 Post by gamekeeper » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:42 am

Interesting photos, I wonder what percentage of today's folks would survive if we went back to those times.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#8 Post by Pitchy » Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:45 am

gamekeeper wrote:
Fri Oct 12, 2018 7:42 am
Interesting photos, I wonder what percentage of today's folks would survive if we went back to those times.
You gotta carry a gun, that leaves about half the country out.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#9 Post by marlinman93 » Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:18 am

I think you're correct Sixgun as it pertains to lazy young folks today. This is the good old times for them, or anyone without work ethic. But It certainly isn't for many who were or are willing to work hard. The hard workers would fair better in almost any era, but I think the post WWII era of the early 50's was a great time to grow up. Of course the late 60's began the ruination of America, and it's only gotten worse since then.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#10 Post by Sixgun » Fri Oct 12, 2018 9:40 am

Marlinman...right.....the fifties until the mid sixties was the greatest time to grow up. There were good paying jobs everywhere....sustainable living wage jobs. The hippie movement really brought on the bums and it seems like 90% of the population is jumping on the lazy man's bandwagon.------6
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#11 Post by .45colt » Fri Oct 12, 2018 4:27 pm

I know maybe three people today who could have survived then (1800's)....page forward to 1941 My dad quit school age 14 and dug ditches 10 hours a day for six years in the depression .........When WW2 broke out and He was drafted , He said that Boot Camp in the Army was a "Country Club". He never saw so much food or got paid to work, exercise, or Anything. when He went in Dad was 159 lb. after advanced training He was 184lb. I never saw anyone Disrespect My Dad. Boy do I Miss Him.

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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#12 Post by piller » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:39 pm

My Dad was born in the Summer of 1929. His parents owned a farm, and all he knew was hard work. His oldest Brother was born in 1913 and was held back in school one year because he missed so much school due to being needed to help on the farm. He was a strong man when he was drafted, and came back from WWII even stronger. Not real big by today's standards at 5'10" and about 210 pounds, but he was known for bending the handles on CeeTee pliers one handed and for being able to move almost anything he took hold of. He could have survived in almost any time in which hard work was useful. The whole bunch could have. I might be able to, but I am not totally sure.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#13 Post by mickbr » Sat Oct 13, 2018 9:04 am

I'm with Oldwin. Life was tough but humans are hardwired to find happiness in between times. That's why your grandaddy didn't need to sleep around, take drugs or paint tattooes all over himself. He finished his day , if he came home okay, none of the kids with diptheria that week, no war breaking out with germany, then sitting on the porch holding his wifes hand was the best feeling in the world. if one of those things went wrong holding her hand felt even better.

Second choice would be mid to late 20th century. Everything was moving so fast, rights, salaries, science, spaceflight to supercomputers, the internet. We grew up used to major advances every 10 years. Then everything slowed down, science got a price tag, they closed space programs, sent manufacture offshore to china, we produced more lawyers than engineers. The current generation thinks advances are 20 years of different sized cellphones..

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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#14 Post by marlinman93 » Sat Oct 13, 2018 10:12 am

Those who lived through the Great Depression always have aa much different outlook on life than anyone born later. My dad was born in 1904 and was a young man just married and starting a family during those years. His father died when dad was 10 years old, and he was the oldest son. He began working for local farmers in the area who knew of the family situation, and wanted to help dad's family out. He had a huge number of younger brothers and sisters at home, and many more older sisters, but they were all 1,000 miles East in the Dakotas.
Having basically grown up at age 10, and dropped out of school to support the family, he learned to live through tough times. So when the Depression hit he already knew how to live on meager income, and did well during those years. But all of it made him stronger, but also look at life differently.
I recall as a kid my dad bringing scrap building materials home from the railroad where he worked. He had us help him pull nails, and stack lumber almost every evening. We put the salvageable nails in buckets, and the lumber in a neat stack. Later my brother and I used dad's anvil to straighten nails, and dad would sort them into drawers under his work bench. Nothing got wasted if it was salvageable.
It also made an impression on me. I wont save even a slightly bent nail myself. I've straightened enough nails as a kid to learn I hate it, and never want to try to save one again. But I do save anything I can of value, and many of the guns in my collection were purchased with problems or repairs needed, because those guns were cheaper to buy, and once fixed became more valuable. So they made my gun fund money go farther.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#15 Post by OldWin » Sat Oct 13, 2018 11:32 am

That reminded me......
My grandfather had peanut cans everywhere full of bent nails. Dozens of them.
It was incredible how little they could live on.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#16 Post by piller » Sat Oct 13, 2018 7:39 pm

My Dad still has old metal coffee cans full of nails, screws, nuts, bolts, washers, nails, pop rivets, and too many more things to mention. If you need an unusual size fastener in S.A.E., he has it. Give him 5 minutes and he can hand you almost any fastener. He can sharpen a drill bit on a grinder faster and better than The Drill Doctor can.
He taught me and my older brothers to use an axe, and how to sharpen it. We can make fishing weights from scrap lead. I still have the 20 foot jumper cables I made out of discarded 1/0 welding cable. The company he worked for required the welders to replace the cables on regularly scheduled intervals, and they just threw it away. I had to dumpster dive to get that cable, but it will start almost any car that you can reach the battery. The people who lived through the great depression and the dust bowl had a lot of knowledge to pass on.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#17 Post by marlinman93 » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:03 am

My dad had the drawers for larger hardware, but had baby food jars for the smaller hardware. The lids were screwed to a board, and then the board was screwed to the rafters in the basement. You could look up and see which jar had what you wanted.
It was a huge task cleaning up after my mom and dad passed away very close to each other. A lot of straightened nails got tossed, and baby food jars of hardware sold at a sale.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#18 Post by Larkbill » Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:54 am

My Dad grew up with 6 older sisters and one older brother. They ate, but not as much as they wanted.

First Saturday in Navy boot camp everyone was complaining because breakfast was pork and beans. Then he found out he could have as much as he wanted. Happy day! They all thought he was goofy because he made three trips through the chow line.

When I was younger I thought I was lazy because I couldn't keep up with him. When I got out in the work world I found I could easily work circles around almost everyone. His example served me well.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#19 Post by mickbr » Mon Oct 15, 2018 1:28 am

Larkbill wrote:
Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:54 am

When I was younger I thought I was lazy because I couldn't keep up with him. When I got out in the work world I found I could easily work circles around almost everyone. His example served me well.
This reminds me of my grandad . He'd say bring the tools to the job or the job to the tools, don't be wandering back and forth. Don't double handle. Clear a straight path, pick up obstacles before you start. Use your body, not just your arms. He never wasted any movement, I apparently did though :D

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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#20 Post by piller » Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:35 am

What "no wasted motion" means to me is watching an Uncle cutting hay with a scythe in a small pasture when I was a kid. He could walk in and cut it down and rake it up into shocks faster than he could have fired up the tractor, opened the gate, and got that 1 acre done by machine. Each swing cut the same amount and each return stroke set him up for the next swing. It was like a precision machine. He used machinery on the big spaces, but the 1 acre space with the stone fenceposts was faster by hand and looked better when finished. He was using a scythe by the time he was 5 years old. Lots of practice.
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Re: The good old days-or maybe not.

#21 Post by Fisher-Price » Mon Oct 15, 2018 7:18 pm

My dad and uncle never drove a new nail until they were adults. Granddaddy had them pull and straighten nails. I still have Daddy’s baby food jars of screws, bolts, nuts and fasteners, and
Coffee cans full of odds and ends. They did not throw anything away.

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