Ok - I'm confused

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GunnyMack
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Ok - I'm confused

#1 Post by GunnyMack » Fri Aug 10, 2018 2:58 pm

So I've made many stocks, made barreled actions, modified actions yadda yadda.
Anyhow I made the Lacewood grips for my single six and since my favorite stock finish is not available around here( if it's even still made), Flecto 66, I decided to use Truoil.
For some reason I can not get truoil to dry! I have tried direct heat, hanging in front of AC unit and still tacky 24 hours after applying.
This morning I decided to try it on different woods. Black walnut- dried in 2 hours, Ipe dried just as fast, Lacewood as flat stock dried almost instantly!
So now I'm confused!!

milton
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#2 Post by milton » Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:00 pm

I think some lacewood is oily enough to slow drying of oil based finishes.I usually soak the wood in acetone for a while to remove the surface oil or seal the wood with Bulls Eye shellac.
"Knowledge without understanding is a dangerous thing. For a little knowledge entices us to walk its path, a bit more provides the foundation on which we take our stand, and a sufficient amount can erect a wall of knowledge around us, trapping us in our own ignorance."

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BlaineG
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#3 Post by BlaineG » Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:21 pm

Strip it off and hand rub it in a drop at a time.
You will miss 100% of the shots you don't take.

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GunnyMack
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#4 Post by GunnyMack » Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:52 pm

When I get to sanding I go grit by grit, 80,100 and I " whisker" with water and oxcallic acid. Then as I go higher in grit I whisker with mineral spirits up to 400. Any natural oil should be lifted out by that point.

As I apply truoil I give a fairly heavy coat and let it sit then rub it in and wipe off the excess.

Still confuses me...

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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#5 Post by Pisgah » Fri Aug 10, 2018 5:52 pm

What I have discovered hardens TruOil faster than anything -- UV light.

Put it in the sunlight.

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Old No7
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#6 Post by Old No7 » Fri Aug 10, 2018 6:02 pm

BlaineG wrote:
Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:21 pm
"Strip it off and hand rub it..."
That's what SHE said!!!

Sorry Gunny -- but Blaine's setup was just too good to resist!!! :wink:

But that's what I would do too...

Old No7
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#7 Post by Pete44ru » Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:14 pm

GunnyMack wrote:
Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:52 pm

As I apply truoil I give a fairly heavy coat and let it sit then rub it in and wipe off the excess.



Like the gal told me when I was barely a teenager - Dude, you're doing it wrong ! . ;)

Like Blaine alluded to above, I've been using Tru-Oil on all the stocks I've refinished since the late 1970's, and through trial & error (LOTS of error), Tru-Oil responds best when a minimal amount is applied, then rubbed down with new pads of 0000 steel wool.

The method I found the most reliable is after wiping the wood down with alcohol ( and letting it evaporate), I dip the tip of my index finger into the Tru-Oil very shallowly, to pick up a tiny dollop of oil on the fingertip (if the fingertip is dripping you've picked up too much oil).

I start with a very tiny bit of oil on handgun & knife handles, a bit more for rifle/shotgun stocks.

The idea is to spread that very little bit of Tru-Oil using a circular motion with the wetted index fingertip, eventually rubbing that tiny bit all over until one handgun/knife grip is covered, or (on a rifle/shotgun stock) the oil is spread out to and area no larger than a US dollar bill.

Once the area (a single side handgun/knife grip or rifle/dollar bill) is lightly covered with oil, then I towel off that index finger and proceed to rub all over (that area only) with the same fingertip until the fingertip literally "drags" while rubbing in.(the stock/finger will "squeak")

At that point, on the other/2nd side handgun/knife grip, or (on a rifle/shotgun stock) moving to an adjacent area, cover & rub that 2nd area as noted above.

(if a rifle/shotgun stock, keep going doing dollar bill areas, one after another, until the stock has received a single coat of Tru-Oil)

I then hang the wood in a curtained/dust-free cabinet( I slapped mine together quickly from a few shelving boards I had hanging around & a section of an old bedsheet) - and let the oil dry for a minimum of 8 hours (I usually work in the evening & let the finish dry overnite).

After the drying period, I rub the wood down with a new pad of 0000 steel wool until the coat of oil applied cannot be seen - then go over the wood with w horseshoe magnet & a clean rag to remove any possible steel wool particles from the surface, before applying another single coat of oil as above.

Repeat the above as req'd for as many coats of Tru-Oil it takes to meet the level of finish desired.

A satin final finish is achieved when the last coat is rubbed down to bare wood; a shiny final finish is achieved by not rubbing down the last coat.

After drying the wood for at least a week, I apply a paste wax to the wood (usually Butcher's Wax - YMMV - but don't use car wax), let the wax dry a bit, then rub it down/out with a clean/smooth cloth (old T-shirt).

Some may think that, "shucks - that's basically what I "do now.

Most that think that way are wrong, and are actually doing "something" a little differently.

I apologize if you think I'm preaching to the choir, but will also encourage you to try this method.

Best of luck !

.
IF IN THESE TYMES OF JEOPARDY,
MORTAL PERIL INVADES THY THOUGHT,
TAKE UP THIS TRVSTY PIECE,
TRVST IN THY GOD, AND FEAR THEE NAUGHT.

(The avatar is me, in 1948 ! )

.

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GunnyMack
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#8 Post by GunnyMack » Sat Aug 11, 2018 4:51 am

Pete44ru wrote:
Fri Aug 10, 2018 8:14 pm
GunnyMack wrote:
Fri Aug 10, 2018 4:52 pm

As I apply truoil I give a fairly heavy coat and let it sit then rub it in and wipe off the excess.



Like the gal told me when I was barely a teenager - Dude, you're doing it wrong ! . ;)

Like Blaine alluded to above, I've been using Tru-Oil on all the stocks I've refinished since the late 1970's, and through trial & error (LOTS of error), Tru-Oil responds best when a minimal amount is applied, then rubbed down with new pads of 0000 steel wool.

The method I found the most reliable is after wiping the wood down with alcohol ( and letting it evaporate), I dip the tip of my index finger into the Tru-Oil very shallowly, to pick up a tiny dollop of oil on the fingertip (if the fingertip is dripping you've picked up too much oil).

I start with a very tiny bit of oil on handgun & knife handles, a bit more for rifle/shotgun stocks.

The idea is to spread that very little bit of Tru-Oil using a circular motion with the wetted index fingertip, eventually rubbing that tiny bit all over until one handgun/knife grip is covered, or (on a rifle/shotgun stock) the oil is spread out to and area no larger than a US dollar bill.

Once the area (a single side handgun/knife grip or rifle/dollar bill) is lightly covered with oil, then I towel off that index finger and proceed to rub all over (that area only) with the same fingertip until the fingertip literally "drags" while rubbing in.(the stock/finger will "squeak")

At that point, on the other/2nd side handgun/knife grip, or (on a rifle/shotgun stock) moving to an adjacent area, cover & rub that 2nd area as noted above.

(if a rifle/shotgun stock, keep going doing dollar bill areas, one after another, until the stock has received a single coat of Tru-Oil)

I then hang the wood in a curtained/dust-free cabinet( I slapped mine together quickly from a few shelving boards I had hanging around & a section of an old bedsheet) - and let the oil dry for a minimum of 8 hours (I usually work in the evening & let the finish dry overnite).

After the drying period, I rub the wood down with a new pad of 0000 steel wool until the coat of oil applied cannot be seen - then go over the wood with w horseshoe magnet & a clean rag to remove any possible steel wool particles from the surface, before applying another single coat of oil as above.

Repeat the above as req'd for as many coats of Tru-Oil it takes to meet the level of finish desired.

A satin final finish is achieved when the last coat is rubbed down to bare wood; a shiny final finish is achieved by not rubbing down the last coat.

After drying the wood for at least a week, I apply a paste wax to the wood (usually Butcher's Wax - YMMV - but don't use car wax), let the wax dry a bit, then rub it down/out with a clean/smooth cloth (old T-shirt).

Some may think that, "shucks - that's basically what I "do now.

Most that think that way are wrong, and are actually doing "something" a little differently.

I apologize if you think I'm preaching to the choir, but will also encourage you to try this method.

Best of luck !

.
Yes, pretty much what and how I've used truoil for the past 25 years, I have used it with good results. However I always used truoil as filler. I liked varathane Flecto 66 as a top coat. Sadly this product is no longer made.
Anyhow, I abandoned the truoil on the grips, sanded them off and applied Watco Danish oil, got 2 coats on yesterday.
I think what went wrong is the first couple coat of truoil I thinned with mineral spirits.

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bmtshooter
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#9 Post by bmtshooter » Sat Aug 11, 2018 10:54 am

Repent ........ and thin no more :wink:
NRA life member

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GunnyMack
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#10 Post by GunnyMack » Sat Aug 11, 2018 12:25 pm

When I learned stock making we ALWAYS thinned truoil for grain filling...not for top coat.

I'm happy with the Danish oil tho!

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Pete44ru
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Re: Ok - I'm confused

#11 Post by Pete44ru » Sat Aug 11, 2018 6:14 pm

bmtshooter wrote:
Sat Aug 11, 2018 10:54 am
Repent ........ and thin no more :wink:
. :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P :P


.
IF IN THESE TYMES OF JEOPARDY,
MORTAL PERIL INVADES THY THOUGHT,
TAKE UP THIS TRVSTY PIECE,
TRVST IN THY GOD, AND FEAR THEE NAUGHT.

(The avatar is me, in 1948 ! )

.

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